Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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NOTE

II.378.1

NOTE, Diplomatic. In diplomatic language the written communication which takes place between accredited agents of different powers is called note. The different kinds of notes are distinguished as follows: The official note, ordinarily signed by an ambassador, a minister plenipotentiary, a chargé d'affaires; in a word, by the diplomatic agent. The verbal note, not signed, either because the diplomatic agent does not wish to assume responsibility in a definitive way, or because there is need simply to recall the essential points of a political conversation upon questions which have been treated viva voce. The secret note, which has been introduced into diplomatic usage to furnish a more complete understanding of the state of affairs and the probabilities of their solution, outside of the official correspondence.

EUGÈNE PAIGNON.

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