Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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FAREWELL ADDRESSES

II.54.1

FAREWELL ADDRESSES (IN U. S. HISTORY). (I.) In 1792, Madison, at Washington's request, furnished him a draft of an address to the American people on his expected retirement in 1799. Having been prevailed upon to accept a second term of office. Washington again took up, in 1796, the idea of a farewell address to the American people. It was dated Sept. 17. 1796, and though containing portions of Madison's former draft, was mainly the work of Hamilton and Washington. Its most important paragraph was its recommendation of abstention from any interference with European affairs, a principle which has since generally characterized the policy of all American statesmen and given most of its success to American diplomacy. It was further extended in 1823 to include abstention by European powers from interference in American affairs. (See MONROE DOCTRINE.)—(II) At the end of his second term of office, President Jackson issued a farewell address to the American people, dated March 3, 1837. It is a fair summary of the principles on which he had centered the party of which he was the leader. (See DEMOCRATIC REPUBLICAN PARTY. IV.)

II.54.2

—See (I.) 1 Statesman's Manual (ed. 1858), 69; 4 Hildreth's United States, 685; 1 Schouler's United States, 331; 12 Washington's Writings, 382; 2 Marshall's Life of Washington (ed. 1831), 396; (II.) 2 Statesman's Manual (ed. 1858), 1054; 3 Parton's Life of Jackson, 627.

A. J.

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