Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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CONSERVATIVE

I.283.1

CONSERVATIVE, (IN U. S. HISTORY.) I. In 1837-40, when support of the sub-treasury bill had become the test of democracy, those democrats who opposed it, as dangerous to the financial interests of the country, formed a temporary alliance under the name of conservatives, voting with the whigs on this single question, but in other cases generally with the democrats. (See INDEPENDENT TREASURY.)

I.283.2

—II. After the suppression of the rebellion, and the inauguration of the plan of reconstruction by congress, the southern whites, who considered their state governments still legally in existence, and were opposed to a change by authority of congress, very generally took the name of conservatives, and in several states, particularly in Virginia, retained it until about 1872.

I.283.3

—III. In the north, throughout the same period, the name was occasionally used as synonymous with democrat, for the purpose of attracting moderate republicans. (See WHIG PARTY, II.; HUNKERS; DEMOCRATIC PARTY, IV., VI.)

ALEXANDER JOHNSTON.

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