Cyclopædia of Political Science, Political Economy, and the Political History of the United States

Edited by: Lalor, John J.
(?-1899)
BIO
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Editor/Trans.
First Pub. Date
1881
Publisher/Edition
New York: Maynard, Merrill, and Co.
Pub. Date
1899
Comments
Includes articles by Frédéric Bastiat, Gustave de Molinari, Henry George, J. B. Say, Francis A. Walker, and more.
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CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

I.202.1

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. Mr. M'Culloch, the English economist, thus defines a chamber of commerce: "An assembly of merchants and traders where affairs relating to trade are treated of," and Bouvier in his "Law Dictionary" as follows: "A society of the principal merchants and traders who meet to promote the general commerce of the place." There are several establishments of this kind in France. In the United States, the term, "Chamber of Commerce," or "Board of Trade," is frequently applied to an institution which would be more appropriately called "Exchange" or "'Change." The economic utility of these institutions will be treated of in the article EXCHANGE, which see.

E. D.

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